NPR-FEATURED NONPROFIT THAT HELPS ELDERLY MUSICIANS BRINGS LEGENDARY BLUES REVUE TO NEW ORLEANS JAZZFEST
 
Former Bourbon Street performer Pat “Mother Blues” Cohen returns to New Orleans for the first time since Hurricane Katrina
 
New Orleans, L.A. – The Music Maker Blues Revue is an all-star band and a thriving musical institution. It was born in the early 1990s as a backing band for the organization’s founding artist Guitar Gabriel, and quickly became the power cell of Music Maker Relief Foundation’s (MMRF) live presence. Featuring dozens of different Music Maker artists over the years—from Etta Baker and Macavine Hayes to Robert Finley and Pat “Mother Blues” Cohen—the Revue has played all over the world in every kind of venue. They’ve busked on the sidewalks of High Point, NC, and received standing ovations at Carnegie Hall. From Argentina to Australia, Europe to Guatemala, and across the U.S., the Revue pleases all types of fans; “the boogiers and the bookworms,” as longtime Revue member Ardie Dean puts it.
 
Louisiana rhythm master Lee Allen Zeno (bass) will serve as the bandleader for this New Orleans infused Revue show at Jazz Fest on Thursday, April 30th in the Blues Tent. Featured artists include: New Orleans based Alabama Slim, former James Brown and Percy Sledge guitarist Robert Lee Coleman, deep Mississippi bluesman Willie Farmer and former Bourbon Street staple Pat “Mother Blues” Cohen. A twenty-year resident of the 9th Ward, this will be Pat Cohen’s first time back in New Orleans since being displaced by Hurricane Katrina.
 
When asked about playing JazzFest Pat “Mother Blues” Cohen had this to say,”I feel like I’m coming back home. New Orleans holds a special place in my heart, this is a big deal for me.”
 
The Music Maker Relief Foundation has deep ties to New Orleans as well. In 2005 the North Carolina based nonprofit raised funds for musicians impacted by Katrina. Throughout its twenty-five year history they have provided support to well-known New Orleans artists Little Freddie King, Guitar Lightnin’ Lee, Ironing Board Sam, Lee Allen Zeno and many more. Timothy Duffy, Music Maker’s founder and executive director made headlines in 2019 with the premiere of his photography exhibition, Timothy Duffy: Blue Muse, which was on view at the New Orleans Museum of Art which featured portraits of Music Maker’s partner artists. NPR Weekend Edition and the Washington Post both covered the groundbreaking exhibition which included a public art component.
 
 
The Music Maker Blues Revue is an all-star band and a thriving musical institution. It was born in the early 1990s as a backing band for Guitar Gabriel, and quickly became a power cell of Music Maker Relief Foundation’s live presence. Featuring dozens of different Music Maker artists over the years—from Etta Baker and Macavine Hayes to Robert Lee Coleman and Pat “Mother Blues” Cohen—the Revue has played all over the world in every kind of venue. They’ve busked on the sidewalks of High Point, NC, and received standing ovations at Carnegie Hall. From Argentina to Australia, Europe to Guatemala, and across the U.S., the Revue pleases all types of fans; “the boogiers and the bookworms,” as longtime Revue member Ardie Dean puts it.
 
Louisiana legend Lee Allen Zeno (bass) will serve as the bandleader for this New Orleans infused Revue show at Jazz Fest. Featured artists include NOLA-based Alabama Slim, James Brown and Percy Sledge guitarist Robert Lee Coleman, deep Mississippi Bluesman Willie Farmer and Pat “Mother Blues” Cohen, who was once a Bourbon Street staple making her first trip back to New Orleans since being displaced by Hurricane Katrina. Their enormous repertoire includes boogie, funk, soul, R&B, and the whole blues spectrum.
 
The group first played together as the Revue at the 1994 Jazz Charlotte Festival. Performers included Guitar Gabriel, Willa Mae Buckner, Macavine Hayes, Mr. Q, Chief Wahoo, Etta Baker, Ardie Dean, Preston Fulp, and Jahue Rorie. In 1998 and 1999, the Revue was joined by Taj Mahal for the 42-city Winston Blues Revival tour. The group continued to traverse the globe into the 2000s, giving artists like Dr. Burt—who had never played outside of Alabama before connecting with Music Maker—a platform to reach thousands of fans nationally and internationally. In 2016, the Revue made a splash at the prestigious Globalfest in New York City, an invitational festival featuring top talent from all over the world.
 
A Music Maker Revue show is fast-paced, with non-stop music. Each featured artist takes a turn in the spotlight and the band makes the transitions seamless. The group’s rollicking closers bring everyone out on stage together and often tear down the house. But, more than just a stirring performance, says Ardie Dean, “every Revue show is a cultural event. All of these artists have a story; a place where they come from.” The Revue tells those stories through music. And it brings those artists together as a musical community. They perform together, travel together, eat together, and form bonds. “They see that they are part of something bigger,” Tim Duffy says, “The Revue is the blues. The Revue will never end, just like the blues will never end.”
 
More about the Music Maker Blues Revue:
The Music Maker Blues Revue first performed at the 1994 Jazz Charlotte Festival and included Guitar Gabriel, Willa Mae Buckner, Macavine Hayes, Mr. Q, Chief Wahoo, Etta Baker, Ardie Dean, Preston Fulp, and Jahue Rorie. In 1998 and 1999, the Revue was joined by Taj Mahal for the 42-city Winston Blues Revival tour. The group continued to traverse the globe into the 2000s, giving artists like Dr. Burt—who had never played outside of Alabama before connecting with Music Maker—a platform to reach thousands of fans nationally and internationally. In 2016, the Revue made a splash at the prestigious Globalfest in New York City, an invitational festival featuring top talent from all over the world.
 
More about Music Maker Relief Foundation:
Music Maker Relief Foundation is a 501c3 nonprofit organization founded in 1994 that supports the soul of America’s blues, gospel, and folk music through partnerships with senior, traditional artists. Music Maker ensures our cultural heritage is passed on to the next generation though live performances, exhibitions, documentation and youth engagement. They have received funding from the National Endowment for the Arts, the North Carolina Arts Council and the North Carolina Humanities Council.