Bible & Tire Recording Company

Latest Release

Dedicated Men of Zion - The Devil Don't Like It - Thumbnail

Dedicated Men of Zion, The Devil Don’t Like It
3.4.22 (Bible & Tire Recording Company)

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Dedicated Men of Zion - The Devil Don't Like It - Thumbnail

Hear

“Lord Hold My Hand”
DMZ

Watch

“The Devil Don’t Like It”
Official Music Video

Latest Release

Johnny Ray Daniels - Thumbnail - Credit Bill Reynolds

Johnny Ray Daniels, Whatever You Need
4.15.22 (Bible & Tire Recording Company)

High Res Photos

Johnny Ray Daniels - Thumbnail - Credit Bill Reynolds

Hear

“I Shall Not Be Moved”
Johnny Ray Daniels

Watch

Sacred Soul of North Carolina
Documentary Feature

Watch

“Have You Tried Jesus”
Little Willie & The Fantastic Spiritualaires

Press

Press Results  |  See All

Arts Fuse Highlights DMZ

Dedicated Men of Zion - July 28 - Boston Museum of Fine Arts"About once in a generation one of those groups makes the leap to the roots music...

Gold Mine Mag Reviews Johnny Ray Daniels

Reviews from American Back Roads: Son House, Ann Peebles, Johnny Ray Daniels and more"Loaded with the gutsy growls and falsetto whoops of long-ago...

The Audio Beat 4-Star Review: Johnny Ray Daniels

4 Stars: Johnny Ray Daniels, Whatever You Need"This album presents a tight set of sacred-soul music, a particularly spicy flavor of gospel that’s...

Week In Pop Premieres “God Is Able”

Premiere: Johnny Ray Daniels, "God Is Able""Daniels presents our weary and wary world with the gospel of goodwill and a mysticism that is...

All Music Review: Johnny Ray Daniels, Whatever You Need

Whatever You Need, review by Thom Jurek"Whatever You Need is the debut album from 76-year-old North Carolina-based singer/guitarist Johnny Ray...

Journal of Gospel Music Highlights Johnny Ray Daniels

After Seven Decades, it’s Johnny Ray Daniels’ Season"And Johnny Ray Daniels didn’t release his first solo album until age 76. It’s never too late...

Paste Review: Johnny Ray Daniels & DMZ

New & Notable Vinyl Releases: Record Store Day 2022 Edition"Johnny Ray Daniels is musical royalty in his native North Carolina."  |  Read More at...

The Boot Weekly Picks: Johnny Ray Daniels

Johnny Ray Daniels, "Jesus Is Waiting""The song, full of swinging gospel harmonies, tells the story of a car crash Daniels suffered that he thought...

Rock & Roll Globe Premiere: Johnny Ray Daniels, “Jesus Is Waiting”

We are proud to premiere the new single off the 76-year-old Sacred Soul vet’s long-awaited solo debut"And that’s why we are beyond thrilled to...

Alt77 Reviews Dedicated Men of Zion

Dedicated Men of Zion, "A Change Is Gonna Come""The most striking element is the incredible singing, born out of the North American soulfulness that...

Journal of Gospel Music Reviews the New Album from DMZ

Dedicated Men of Zion – The Devil Don’t Like It"Once again, they showcase their earthiness, beginning with the first cut, “Lord Hold My Hand,” which...

American Blues Scene Premiere: Johnny Ray Daniels, “I Will Not Be Moved”

Sacred Soul Pioneer Johnny Ray Daniels Premieres First Single ‘I Shall Not Be Moved’ From Upcoming Album"Johnny Ray made rock and roll history early...

Press Releases  |  See All

Dedicated Men of Zion Confirm NPR Mountain Stage, Northeast Tour, As Raves for ‘The Devil Don’t Like It’ (Bible & Tire) Roll In

Dedicated Men of Zion (DMZ) – the North Carolina sacred soul family quartet that’s been featured in an NPR Tiny Desk Concert – has confirmed a...

Out This Week: “Soul-Stirring” (Paste) Johnny Ray Daniels Marks Solo Debut at 76 Years Old

Getting his start with rock and roll band The Soul Twisters before becoming multi-instrumentalist for sacred soul legends the Glorifying Vines...

NPR Tiny Desk Alums Dedicated Men of Zion (DMZ) Confirm Second Album The Devil Don’t Like It, Out March 4 on Bible & Tire

Bruce Watson Produced Album, Which Also Features Grammy Winner Matt Ross-Spang on Guitar“The world needs this music right now.” –Robin Hilton, NPR...

NPR Music, Mojo, More Hail Field-Recorded Sacred Soul of North Carolina Album and Film (Bible & Tire Recording Co./Music Maker Foundation)

Outlets like NPR, MOJO, WNYC, and DownBeat are hailing Sacred Soul of North Carolina, the compilation album and half-hour documentary film out last...

Elder Jack Ward’s Solo Album Debut at Age 83 “Truly Shakes Foundations” (MOJO)

Esquire, Apple Music Make it Featured New Release PicksElder Jack Ward – the sacred soul singer born in the Mississippi Delta who came up singing...

Bruce Watson’s Bible & Tire Recording Co. & Music Maker Relief Foundation Share Soul-Jolting New Single “Shake Me” by Bishop Albert Harrison & The Gospel Tones from ‘Sacred Soul of North Carolina’

Album and accompanying film recorded in the field in makeshift recording studio in rural, eastern NC right before pandemicBible & Tire Recording...

Bruce Watson’s Bible & Tire Recording Co. Joins with Music Maker Foundation to Examine Quartet Tradition on New Compilation Sacred Soul of North Carolina, To Be Released October 15

Accompanying Documentary Film Out Oct. 5 Via FolkstreamsWhen Tim Duffy of the Music Maker Foundation took Memphis’ Bruce Watson (Fat Possum Records,...

Bible & Tire Recording Co. Continues Memphis Sacred Soul Winning Streak with Elder Jack Ward’s Already Made, Out Aug. 20

1st Single Out Tomorrow with Music VideoElder Jack Ward could’ve gone either way. He grew up in the Mississippi Delta, listening to Elmore James and...

Bible & Tire Recording Co. to Release New Treasure Trove of ’70s Soul Rarities From Legendary Memphis Label JCR June 18

The Last Shall Be first: The JCR Records Story, Vol. 2 Follows Last Year's Critically-Acclaimed Vol. 1, Hailed As "A Righteous Riot" by...

“Awesome (WNYC)” “Raw” (Brooklyn Vegan) ‘The Last Shall Be First: The JCR Records Story, Vol. 1’ (Bible & Tire Recordings) Socks Listeners with ‘70s Memphis Sacred Soul

An interview with WKNO, Memphis’ NPR station, is forthcomingBible & Tire Recording Co., the new sacred soul label from Bruce Watson of Fat...

70s Memphis Sacred Soul Compilation From Bruce Watson of Fat Possum; Brooklyn Vegan Runs 1st Single

Brooklyn Vegan premieres first single "Keep On Pushing" by the Calvary NightingalesBruce Watson’s acclaimed Memphis, TN-based label Bible & Tire...

About

Bio – Johnny Ray Daniels

Johnny Ray Daniels was born in 1946 in the Beaver Dam area Greenville, North Carolina, one of seven children. The six boys in the Daniels family shared a talent for singing, which their mother never missed an opportunity to show to friends and neighbors. “My boys can sing,” she would say, and made them rise to sing in church or when company came over. Too young for drivers licenses, he and his brothers would sing together as they walked the roads to church and town.

Greenville is the largest city in rural Pitt County, situated in North Carolina’s vast, flat, coastal plain. Surrounded by country and farmland, Greenville is still a small community by most measures, and was a quiet place to grow up. Daniels was raised in a farming family, until his father quit to work at a tobacco factory in the nearby town of Farmville. His mother, who had stayed home to raise the children, soon found work in the same factory, taking night shifts while her husband worked days. Daniels’ father played guitar, but only taught his son one song. Mostly, he watched his father and trained his ear to listen. Being self-taught honed his intuition for music. “When I play, it’s like I can hear a voice in my ear saying ‘do this, do that,’” he says. “I’ve got my own style because I don’t try to play like anyone else, I just play what I hear.”

By age 20, Daniels and a group of local friends started up a rock ‘n’ roll band called the Soul Twisters. They were popular in the local music scene, part of a period in Eastern North Carolina’s history that created a generation of musical talent shaping the national emergence of funk, R&B, and soul. For almost a decade the Soul Twisters played gigs as far north as New York and as close to home as the local venues frequented by students from Eastern Carolina University. When professional bands came through town, they were often asked to be the warmup act.

One night, Daniels’ life changed forever. He was standing on stage at a white nightclub in the neighboring city of Wilson, looking out over the faces of the audience dancing and drinking. “I saw them just like a picture,” he recalls. “In the blink of an eye, it was like I could hear the Lord saying, ‘You’re in the wrong place.’” He played out the rest of his booking obligations with the Soul Twisters, and then quit the band. The nightclub had been courting them with an exclusivity contract, offering good money and a custom van to travel in, but Daniels turned it all down, to the disbelief of the club’s owner. But by then he had made his promise to turn his life over to God. “You promise the Lord something and don’t do it, some big thing could happen. You don’t make a vow to the Lord and then back up.”

After leaving his gear and his guitar with his bandmates, Daniels started his music career over again, this time in the church. He began singing with his choir while running a business doing carpet and tile installation for the schools in Pitt County. He married a woman named Dorothy Vines, who was also singing in church with her sisters under the name the Vines Sisters. Daniels began attending their church, and when they found out he could play guitar they encouraged him to play piano too, something Daniels had never done. He started on just two fingers. “I said Lord, give me that gift and I’ll play it for you. My fingers opened up and I’ve been playing ever since.” Daniels put the music to every song the Vines Sisters ever sang as the group built up a reputation as one of the most stirring gospel groups in Eastern North Carolina. Holding to a hard-driving old-school quartet style, they were soon dubbed the “Glorifying” Vines Sisters by a local radio DJ, for the way they sang and shouted for the Lord. Daniels drove the Glorifying Vines Sisters on long road trips around the national gospel circuit, often coming home to sleep for four hours before putting in a day of work and getting right back on the road again. After 54 years, he turned his business over to his son Anthony, who leads his own group The Dedicated Men of Zion and continues the musical legacy of the Daniels and Vines families.

“I just love it anyway,” Daniels says of his dedication to music. “When I get up and go sing, I pray to the Lord to bless me that I’ll be able to bless someone else. If you go to a heater and it’s got no fire on, you ain’t gonna feel nothing. But you turn it on, you’ve got heat coming out of there. I want the people to feel and hear what I’m doing. I like to bless people and I like to make people happy.” Daniels released a solo LP in 2022 with the Memphis-based record label Bible and Tire, his first time ever recording as a solo artist. “By the help of God,” he says, “I’ve done it.”

–Zoe van Buren

Bio – Dedicated Men of Zion

Harmony is serious business where the Dedicated Men of Zion come from. For their eldest member Anthony “Amp” Daniels, it was so serious that every day his mother would call her children inside, turn off the television, and make them sing in harmony, talk in harmony, do everything in harmony. Singing well together was a virtue that she and her sisters had learned from their own father, and Anthony gave it to his children in return. Older folks in the Black communities of rural North Carolina relied on that singing for everything in a time when both respect and money were especially scarce. “That’s where that seriousness is from,” Amp remembers. “They demand respect. They’re serious about what they do and they don’t play with God.”

The Dedicated Men of Zion came up out of this singing land of eastern North Carolina, around the city of Greenville and its small neighboring town of Farmville. Each trained in the church and the home, the group’s four vocalists – Anthony Daniels, Antwan Daniels, Dexter Weaver, and Marcus Sugg – share the bond of that upbringing and another more literal bond of kinship (they’re all family now through blood or marriage).

Theirs is a community dense with talent and legendary impact on the origins of gospel, funk, R&B, soul, and jazz; a place where the sounds of Saturday night and Sunday morning couldn’t help but jump their lanes. The group’s own backgrounds tell that story. Anthony Daniels, the eldest of the group, led a career in R&B down in Atlanta, backing up the likes of Bebe Winans, Toni Braxton, and Elton John. Antwan Daniels, the youngest member and son of Anthony, was playing keyboards and organ in church while simultaneously injecting his hip-hop production work with traditional gospel roots. But the church was always the backbone. Weaver, whose grandmother managed several gospel groups around Greenville, had sung with elder quartet groups for years, running into Anthony Daniels around the sacred soul circuit. When they both found themselves without a group, Weaver turned to Daniels and said “I don’t know what you’re gonna do but if you do something, I’m on board with you. I want to be with you.”

In 2014 Weaver and Daniels, with Antwan on keys, came together to form the Dedicated Men of Zion’s original iteration, along with singers Trevoris Newton and Darren Cannon. The group was quickly gaining a following in eastern North Carolina when Newton suddenly passed away in 2018. The loss of one member was soon followed by Cannon’s departure. The arrival of Marcus Sugg re-completed the group. Sugg, who had grown up singing in church choirs and a little on the side during a stint in the military, was soon to be Anthony Daniels’ son in law.

It was with this new vocal lineup that the Dedicated Men of Zion caught the attention of the Music Maker Relief Foundation while performing in a church concert organized by Music Maker and the Glorifying Vines Sisters, the longstanding Farmville gospel institution of Anthony Daniel’s mother and aunts. Joining Music Maker’s artist roster of roots musicians from across the South, the Dedicated Men of Zion began reaching new audiences not yet clued in to the rhythmic, electrified, sacred sounds of the rural southeast. Sacred Soul, being the music of personal and collective survival, even secular audiences were catching the spirit of joy and determination. The message, for Anthony Daniels, was always that “if He did it for me, He’ll do it for you. Just keep praying and love one another.” In troubled times, there’s a need for a hopeful word and a testimony that there is a way.

Through Music Maker, the group connected with the newly founded record label Bible & Tire Recording Co., helmed by producer Bruce Watson of Fat Possum Records. Watson had been listening to the hard-praising drive of country gospel coming straight from the church which he’d later coin as “sacred soul”. His new label was delivering that genuine soul sound beyond the church circuits from which it came. The gospel music coming out of those small rural Black churches was in fact the headwaters of much of the commercial music made over the last half century, and Watson was ready to bet that mass audiences, already familiar with the sounds of classic soul, would discover a hunger for gospel’s emotional truth and purposefulness.

The Dedicated Men of Zion’s, Can’t Turn Me Around, was recorded in Memphis at Watson’s Delta-Sonic Sound in 2019. Backed by Watson’s all-star studio band, the recordings bring great depth to the incredible harmonies that soar above. The album marks a moment of clarity for the group. By embracing their roots, they knew they were pointedly taking a right turn where some of their peers had veered left in a race to make gospel sound like anything other than what it was back in the day: soul music. Each track on Can’t Turn Me Around comes from that overflowing heritage of sacred soul. Tradition sets a high standard of excellence. What more can new artists pour into that cup? The Dedicated Men of Zion accepted that challenge with the seriousness of their raising and the joy of spiritual inspiration. With their second album they get back to where they came from – soul and the salvation of harmony. In Anthony Daniels’ own words, “You want to live, get to where the root is. Get close to the root.”

–ZOE VAN BUREN

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